For many people living in care facilities, the means to communicate verbally has become limited or lost due to dementia and this can significantly impact self-esteem. The good news is that over 90% of communication is non-verbal.

For many people living in care facilities, the means to communicate verbally has become limited or lost due to dementia and this can significantly impact self-esteem. The good news is that over 90% of communication is non-verbal.

In this article we cover:

  • Non verbal forms of communication
  • How to Practice Active Listening

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Comments   Post a Comment

Kayleigh 19th Aug 2017
I 100% agree! This can not be emphasized enough when taking care of residents with cognitive impairment. Our posture, facial expressions and body movements make all the difference. Thank you for posting!
Eileen 12th Jul 2017
This is wonderful. I am an Occupational Therapist and I work in LTC. Dementia is my specialty. I just became a member. Body Language is everything. It is very difficult when a dementia client with very limited verbal language, is trying to speak to you. You must understand their body language, so they feel included, understood and comfortable.
Talita 17th Jul 2017
Thanks for your feedback Eileen, much appreciated.
Daz 13th Jun 2017
Daz has submitted a new article: How to Communicate with Body Language
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