10 Lifelong Learning Themes for the Elderly

10 Lifelong Learning Themes for the Elderly

Found In: Activities Articles

A learning environment makes life more fulfilling. It inspires and stimulates individuals while staving off loneliness by providing opportunities for social engagement, another important factor influencing well-being.

We all have natural abilities, some of which we have never had the chance to develop; but it is never too late!

A learning environment makes life more fulfilling. It inspires and stimulates individuals while staving off loneliness by providing opportunities for social engagement, another important factor influencing well-being.

Many elderly residents are interested and capable of learning new things. Learning opportunities can help them find more joy and fulfilment from daily life.



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Janet 11th Jul 2020 Coordinator, Adult Day Center
This post has really inspired me! I send out weekly packets to our seniors while we are shutdown and I'll enclose Lifelong Learning in them.

We haven't had any clients for four months...your ideas will keep me from getting rusty!

Thank you!
Susan 11th Jul 2020 Activity Director
Hi Janet
Yes learning is a lifelong process when you stop learning stop living
This is what I told our residents
I told them I do not want to see their brains rolling down the halls because they are not using them
Solange 28th Jan 2017 Diversional Therapist
Hi Helen, I think you are doing well; it is a challenge to motivate clients when their attention span is so short. You could try activities such as Proverbs, Nursery Rhymes/Lullaby, Scent Guessing, and quizzes which remain in their mind despite dementia. By all means try audience participation and flash card short stories. Best wishes.
Helen 27th Jan 2017 Home Duties
Our Seniors Church members about 4-5 members visit one Care facility about once every 3 months due the scheduling of other programs for the High Care participants. We play the piano and sing small chorus's familiar from Sunday School. Its the short talks I'm concerned about. It can be a bible story or one with a moral or just something to get their interest. None could play a game. most are confined to beds, while others just sit un-engaged. As I am a fairly bright Senior, I try to speak slowly and clear, I try eye contact and touching as well. I can see that their attention span is limited but I am trying to find ways to spark their interest. Should I try Audience participation? tell a story with flash cards? any help would be really appreciated.
Lorraine 24th Jan 2017 Diversional Therapist
I will include a learning activity on the next calendar - sounds great
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